Sports Car Club of America

Rally News

Event 05/01/2014

WDCR Road Rally Handbook

Bill Demming and Kim Ciccone look over the General Instructions before jumping in their machine. (Alaska Region SCCA) Bill Demming and Kim Ciccone look over the General Instructions before jumping in their machine. (Alaska Region SCCA) View Full Size

 

Imagine that you know nothing about road rallying and have just entered your first local event. You arrive at the start as a crowd is starting to gather around the registration table. An entry form, waiver, vehicle-worthiness form must be completed, then the entry fee is paid. In exchange, you receive a set of General Instructions (GIs) which, you are told, are instructions that tell you how to read the Route instructions (RIs) which will be given out as you line up for the start.

Chances are the GI is between five and 12 pages in length, containing clarifications for all the situations, real or imagined, that have occurred in the rally region for the past several decades.

You are already on sensory overload. Worse, you notice that there are others at the start that seen to know what they are doing and even have time to joke around. The rally has not yet started and you already feel out of your depth.

At best, you see that you will need to run a number of these events before reaching a level of comfort, let alone competitiveness

A number of Regions have reported success at attracting new competitors to road rallying, but poor results in getting them to come back. Part of the answer is to provide a Rally School to expose new people to the sport. The Washington, D.C. Region holds a school a couple weeks prior to their season-opening rally. It includes classroom sessions, the actual running of an odometer check, a short rally and a debriefing session.

The Finger Lakes Region holds short schools just prior to the start of their events. Either way, those who attend have a leg up on other competitors relying on trial and error to learn about Rally.

Click here to download your copy of the Road Rally Handbook - for use in putting on a Road Rally School or enhancing your understanding the sport.

At best, you see that you will need to run a number of these events before reaching a level of comfort, let alone competitiveness

A number of Regions have reported success at attracting new competitors to road rallying, but poor results in getting them to come back. Part of the answer is to provide a Rally School to expose new people to the sport. The Washington, D.C. Region holds a school a couple weeks prior to their season-opening rally. It includes classroom sessions, the actual running of an odometer check, a short rally and a debriefing session.

The Finger Lakes Region holds short schools just prior to the start of their events. Either way, those who attend have a leg up on other competitors relying on trial and error to learn about Rally.

Click here to download your copy of the Road Rally Handbook - for use in putting on a Road Rally School or enhancing your understanding the sport. Additional forms for Road Rally can be found here.

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